Top 40 under 40: Profiles in success

Published
  • January 26 2018, 5:14pm EST
The numbers alone are impressive: 10 advisors, $30 billion in combined AUM, $150 million in production.

These young planners who led the Top 40 under 40 ranking are, in many ways, the cream of the crop. They share a strong work ethic, diligent attention to detail and competitive mindset. But from there they diverge, with each taking a different approach to structuring their practices and serving their clients.

In Dane Runia's office, the emphasis is on what's happening in a client’s personal life more than anything transpiring within their portfolio.

"If you sat in one of our typical client meetings, you'd be surprised how often we're talking about something other than finances," says Runia, who ranked No. 1 on this year's Top 40 list and works at Merrill Lynch.

Adam Merino, a Morgan Stanley broker who came in No. 6, emphasizes the team-oriented model of his practice. He eschews what he calls a "hierarchical" structure in favor of a "horizontal working environment" where all members work collaboratively and sit at the same desk.

"We all wear multiple hats, so there's not a defined role for one person versus another," he says.

But regardless of how they built their practices, it's resulted in similar results: professional success and more intimate client relationships. In Bob White's case, he actually presided over a client's wedding at Grand Central Terminal in New York.

"That's the fun part about this job. It's really about making that personal connection with people, making a difference and making a change," says White, a HighTower advisor who ranked No. 2.

Scroll through to learn about more about these elite advisors.

Finalists for the ranking had to be no older than 39 as of Dec. 31, 2017, and be employed at wirehouses, regional broker-dealers or boutique wealth management firms. Production totals were used to determine the rankings.

The numbers alone are impressive: 10 advisors, $30 billion in combined AUM, $150 million in production.

These young planners who led the Top 40 under 40 ranking are, in many ways, the cream of the crop. They share a strong work ethic, diligent attention to detail and competitive mindset. But from there they diverge, with each taking a different approach to structuring their practices and serving their clients.

In Dane Runia's office, the emphasis is on what's happening in a client’s personal life more than anything transpiring within their portfolio.

"If you sat in one of our typical client meetings, you'd be surprised how often we're talking about something other than finances," says Runia, who ranked No. 1 on this year's Top 40 list and works at Merrill Lynch.

Adam Merino, a Morgan Stanley broker who came in No. 6, emphasizes the team-oriented model of his practice. He eschews what he calls a "hierarchical" structure in favor of a "horizontal working environment" where all members work collaboratively and sit at the same desk.

"We all wear multiple hats, so there's not a defined role for one person versus another," he says.

But regardless of how they built their practices, it's resulted in similar results: professional success and more intimate client relationships. In Bob White's case, he actually presided over a client's wedding at Grand Central Station in New York.

"That's the fun part about this job. It's really about making that personal connection with people, making a difference and making a change," says White, a HighTower advisor who ranked No. 3.

Scroll through to learn about more about these elite advisors.

Finalists for the ranking had to be no older than 39 as of Dec. 31, 2017 and be employed at the regional broker-dealers. Production totals were used to determine the rankings.

No. 10 Umesh Trikha, Merrill Lynch

Age: 35
AUM: $1,126,279,998
Production: $4,212,675

For advisor Umesh Trikha, working with people is something he's enjoyed since he landed his first job selling printer cartridges in London at age 16.

"It was a true sales job. You were earning 10 pounds a cartridge. But the lessons it taught me were talking to people and making connections," Trikha says.

He carried that knowledge with him when he became an intern at Merrill Lynch in Williamsburg, Virginia. And, ultimately, into his career as a New York-based financial advisor.

"You guide clients on all aspects of their financial affairs, and it's a great feeling when you can help facilitate reaching their aspirations. There is also a lot of humility to the fact that they are trusting you with their wealth," he says.

Trikha, a British native, became an international financial advisor at the firm in 2003. He studied economics at the College of William and Mary in Virginia, opting for what he saw as the greater flexibility of U.S. universities over their U.K. counterparts.

He credits his success to his mentor and former business partner, Sanjay Patel, who now serves as a Merrill Lynch market executive in New York.

Today, his four-member team in New York serves primarily international clients, but also U.S. ones, many of whom are executives. He says U.S. clients tend to require more tax optimization and estate planning.

"There are more bells and whistles that they may need versus an international client who may only be giving you a portion of their wealth," he says.

Wealth management is of course a competitive field and it's important to "stay curious," Trikha says. He is an avid reader, sometimes devouring three books a week. (He recommends historian Walter Isaacson's 2017 biography of Leonardo da Vinci.)

"I think the biggest competition you have when you come to work is yourself, whether it's day one or day 1,000," he says.

―Andrew Welsch

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No. 9 Adam Rosenfeld, Merrill Lynch

Age: 39
AUM: $741,696,067
Production: $4,243,907

When clients take charge of their finances, they control their own destiny. That’s what coaxed advisor Adam Rosenfeld, 39, from pursuing a career in law and into the financial services industry.

A self-described “people person,” Rosenfeld says that catering to his ultrahigh-net-worth client-base brings him a significant amount of joy. “It’s not work at all,” he says. “I spend my day talking to my friends.”

Rosenfeld didn’t initially leave the University of Miami with plans to become an advisor. After graduation, he applied to law school and paid the bills by clerking for an attorney who happened to be in the same building as a Morgan Stanley office.

A chance encounter in the elevator developed into a friendship with a Morgan Stanley branch manager and led to an eventual job interview. Next, Rosenfeld was given a big blue book with almost every phone number in Miami, and he was told to start making calls.

“I didn’t come from any family money. I didn’t inherit anybody’s business. And I didn’t start with a team,” he says. “It was just me, the phone, the computer, and I just worked really hard to put myself in a position to get lucky.”

Eventually, Rosenfeld’s cold calls paid off when he got a response from a couple that would form the basis of his client pool. The couple later told him that his pleasant voice and demeanor made them want to work with him. They referred their friends, which helped Rosenfeld to grow the practice even further.

After 10 years with Morgan Stanley, Rosenfeld took his team to Merrill Lynch in 2011. He is currently serving as a managing director and senior financial advisor with the firm’s global wealth management division.

Looking ahead, Rosenfeld says his six-member team wants to take a “doing more for less” approach and continue to differentiate itself as a unique boutique office.

“In developing that high, high relationship, my clients wanted to do more things with me,” Rosenfeld says. “They wanted to do lending. They wanted to do banking… The positives about Merrill was I just saw this vision of how I would be able to do everything with them and that’s what happened.”

―Amanda Schiavo

No. 8 Keith Apton, UBS

Age: 39
AUM: $1,096,035,101
Production: $4,305,450

From a young age, Keith Apton knew he wanted to work in finance. But it wasn't until college that he set upon the path that would lead to him becoming a UBS advisor.

“I was very fortunate to take a semester off at school to work for what ended up being the largest ESOP at the time,” says Apton, who was studying business administration at Virginia Tech at the time.

Apton graduated in 2000 and in 2002 began working for Morgan Stanley, where he would spend the next seven years before moving to UBS in 2009. He knew difficulties were waiting for him in his chosen field, but those didn’t deter him from pushing forward.

“To build a business in this industry requires sacrifice,” Apton says. “You work harder I believe than many of your [generational] peers, longer hours, and you often make less…for a good three to five years, and that’s kind of what it takes to be in the game.”

Even 17 years into his career in the financial services industry, Apton is still working those long hours and traveling constantly for business.

Apton explains that when he started out his approach was typified by targeting scale and concentrating on centers of influence.

"I spent a lot of time developing good personal relationships with foundations,” he explains. “Getting to know who they were as human beings and having them get to know me.”

Developing trust and confidence with professionals that entrepreneurs were already working with would help generate a “warm introduction," Apton says.

―Amanda Schiavo

No. 7 Nicole Christians, Merrill Lynch

Age: 36
AUM: $642,056,683
Production: $4,336,563

As a double major in history and philosophy at the University of Michigan, Nicole Christians figured she'd follow in her dad's footsteps and become a lawyer. Or, maybe, pursue her love of playing the cello at music school.

But then, "almost by happenstance," she landed a summer internship at Merrill Lynch that set her on a very different career path. There she met John Kulhavi, a Vietnam War helicopter pilot who became an enduring mentor to Christians, immersing her in all sides of the business.

"I've worn so many hats here — went from grabbing sandwiches at golf outings, to anything and everything that could be done here, I've done," she says.

Now, more than a decade-and-a-half later, Christians and her partner Aaron Romain, together own 84% of the practice (Kulhavi retired last year). The firm, based in Farmington Hills, Michigan, serves about 700 households, each with assets typically in the range of $1 million to $10 million.

Christians takes pride in the size of her firm — 20 strong, representing a diverse array of expertise.

With such a large team in place, Christians says her firm is geared toward a high degree of specialization, so one associate might concentrate on lending, while others are focused on other aspects of financial planning.

"We really don't have a lot of overlap in terms of what we do best. We've built the team around people's strengths," Christians says. "The market environment is so vast in terms of products, we came to the conclusion that we should just really be laser-focused on what interests us and what we do best."

The practice is so specialized that it even divides up different generations within client families. "I may handle mom and dad," Christians says, and another advisor might work with their adult children.

In a field where advisors frequently jump ship from one firm to another, Christians says that her clients appreciate continuity of the Kulhavi team (one associate has been with the firm more than 30 years).

Christians is also painfully aware of the infrequent appearance of women on lists such as these, and often steps out from her practice to promote women's involvement in wealth management.

"I think there's a general lack of awareness," she says. "It's something that I'm pretty passionate about. I feel like the industry could really benefit [from greater gender balance]."

So any regrets about choosing financial services over music school? Christians would say “no.”

"It's the best of both worlds," she says, "because I still get to play, and I really like my day job."

―Kenneth Corbin

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No. 6 Adam Merino, Morgan Stanley

Age: 34
AUM: $506,735,824
Production: $4,338,742

At age 34, Adam Merino is now making his third appearance on this list, but that’s hardly surprising. Success has come early in Merino's life.

As a college intern, he was vetting top-shelf hedge fund managers for consideration in the portfolios of the ultrahigh-net worth-clients of CTC Consulting in Portland, Oregon. Then throughout his senior year at Lewis and Clark College, Merino was working as a full-time, 40-hour-a-week employee at CTC. (If that wasn't enough, he also played on Lewis and Clark's basketball team.)

Merino's work evaluating hedge fund leaders put him in the company of some of Wall Street's top managers when he was barely old enough to buy a drink, while also steeping him in the analytical, research-heavy side of the business.

"The initial year or year-and-a-half of work at CTC really helped to build out my analytical skillset, but really when it comes down to evaluating a money manager, it's more a qualitative decision," he says. "That's something that you only learn from sitting in with money managers."

After college Merino decamped to New York, joining U.S. Trust and then, following that firm's acquisition by Bank of America, he jumped to Morgan Stanley in the summer of 2007.

At that time, the markets were heading into a period of volatility that would spiral into a full-blown meltdown, and by 2009, only Merino and his long-time mentor, Bob Stolar, were left from the original team.

"There was definite fear in the marketplace," Merino recalls, though he describes that upheaval as "an opportunity to get more and more ingrained with our largest clients, and become more of a source of trust and relief for them."

"It goes to show you that if you stick it out and do right by your clients, in the long run you'll do pretty well," he says.

Now Merino is a managing director at his firm, which he jointly heads up with Stolar, leading a team of six and serving a roster of around 35 families, whose average wealth Merino ballparks at around $75 million.

Merino emphasizes the team-oriented model of his practice, eschewing a "hierarchical" structure in favor of a "horizontal working environment" where all members work collaboratively and sit at the same desk.

"We're all actively engaging each other, asking questions," he says. "We all wear multiple hats, so there's not a defined role for one person versus another."

―Kenneth Corbin

No. 5 Fulvio Urbinati, Morgan Stanley

Name:
Age: 39
AUM: $560,784,552
Production: $4,523,420

In another life, Fulvio Urbinati could have been a linguist. The Morgan Stanley advisor speaks three languages — a skill which has certainly come in handy over the years. His book of business now spans three continents, including clients in Chile and Peru, the U.S. and Canada, and France and the U.K., he says.

At the age of 39, Urbinati has made the On Wall Street “Top 40 Under 40” list four times. He manages $560 million in client assets and generates $4.5 million in revenue a year. Ninety percent of his ultrahigh-net-worth clients are international, and they all came from referrals. “I never did a cold call in my life,” he says.

Early in his career, Urbinati worked as a fixed-income trader with BNP Paribas before making the jump to financial planning in his native Brazil. The transition, he says, was the easy part. “The textbook stuff wasn’t the problem,” Urbinati says. “When you hit the road — and have to perform and bring in assets and manage — that’s when it becomes hard.”

Young and inexperienced, Urbinati says it took time to persuade clients to trust him with their money. “People with a lot of money aren’t always easy to convince,” Urbinati says. “It takes a few years to gain traction and be respected, and to prove yourself.”

He first joined partners Daniele Conci and Edouard Crepy at BNP Paribas in Miami before moving the team to Morgan Stanley in 2011. His book more than tripled since he made the move, he says.

To become successful in the HNW space, advisors have to understand well-heeled clients and especially their lofty expectations for their financial and personal lives, he says. “They have such a sense of urgency,” Urbinati says. “You really have to have the same DNA.”

Back in Brazil, Urbinati initially got his start in the financial business by following in his grandfather’s footsteps. He took a job at Banco Sudameris on the same day his grandfather — a longtime financial professional at the firm — passed away at the age of 96, he says.

“I try not to pay attention too much to these things,” he says. “For me, that was a message — some things are just meant to be.”

As for the future, Urbinati believes shifting his clients to discretionary accounts is the key to unlocking growth potential, he says.

“We are steering the ship,” Urbinati says. In the next 12 to 24 months, his team hopes to have most accounts managed on a discretionary basis. “It’s a pretty big ship,” he admits.

―Sean Allocca

No. 4 Mihir Patel, Morgan Stanley

Age: 37
AUM: $386,596,734
Production: $4,644,143

Growing up in a house full of doctors, Mihir Patel was expected to follow in his family’s footsteps. He didn’t.

“My mom always wanted me to be a doctor,” Patel says. “We laughed when I eventually became managing director. I got the M.D., but in a completely different field.”

The New York-based advisor has now been with Morgan Stanley for seven years and manages $387 million in client assets. He previously worked at Merrill Lynch, having started there as an intern in college.

At the start of his career, Patel had the advantage of working under a seasoned vet who mentored him, he says. “When I started with a large book of business, I learned from partners and clients that were 50 years my senior,” Patel says. “I learned from the old-school market participants and brought a more youthful approach.”

Then, the tech bubble burst.

“Coming out of college in 2001, the landscape was riddled with the tech bubble and Enron,” Patel says. “Sales and trading was the sexy side of things, especially the compensation. But with wealth management, I could get involved on a more intricate level with clients as they went through big life changes. You feel more connected.”

Patel says his team’s “secret sauce” is merging that same combination of youth and wisdom. “The younger members are more adoptive and bring a new approach to today’s market realities. At 38, I’m one of the oldest people on the team.”

With their youth, Patel focuses his team on generational wealth and attracting the next cohort of investors. He encourages his younger team members to think outside the box when attracting new clients.

One thing Patel is certain about is his decision to focus on the markets instead of medicine.

“I truly admire what doctors do and what they give back to the world. But, I broke the mold,” Patel says, “which I sincerely don’t regret.”

―Sean Allocca

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No. 3 Bob White, HighTower Advisors

Age: 37
AUM: $725,374,211
Production: $5,761,663

New York-based planner Bob White is no stranger to hearing about monumental changes in his clients' lives. He works with multigenerational families and finds that keeping close tabs on their stories pays off: His team's business is almost entirely referral-based.

"We always try to understand the families we're working with. Is there a particular relative that we don't know?" he says. "That's how this business is growing — by building on existing clientele and having them express their delight [about working with us] to people that trust them. That trust just extends to me and the team."

White, who started his career at UBS before transitioning with his team to HighTower in 2010, recalls one instance where he became part of a client's story in a very different way. A distressed client called. Her husband had left her and her children without notice, and she was not financially savvy and realized it was time to learn.

"I talked to her a lot… and we basically restructured her finances," White says. The conversations often went beyond the numbers. Many were therapeutic, with White helping her "talk things through and saying that things could work out," he says.

After some time went by, White noticed something brighter in his client's demeanor.

"Instead of being anxious and worried, she started smiling a little bit more. She was making more optimistic, forward-looking statements about what she wanted to do, and travel and how her children were doing better in school and had become adjusted to everything," White says.

Eighteen months later, White got a happy call — his client had gotten engaged. "I asked her when the date was,'" White says. "She said they were going to make it a very small wedding."

After she mentioned the courthouse, White mentioned he was ordained. "I said 'well, if you don't want it to be a big deal, why don't you and your fiancée come to the office and I can sign the papers for you? She chuckled and said 'Hold on, I'm gonna call you back.'"

She invited White to lunch, and a few weeks later the plan was for the couple to get married on New Year's Day at Grand Central Station. White helped them find a quiet spot to begin the nuptials.

"She and her fiancé were gazing into each other's' eyes. It was adorable. As I'm looking around, I noticed a bit of a crowd was building," he says. "I started speaking a little louder so people could hear. At the 'you may kiss the bride' part of the ceremony, it erupted into applause," White says. "There were probably 300 people watching. [The couple] had no idea because they were just looking at each other."

While he notes that stories exactly like these aren't necessarily common, White says it emphasizes the reasons he works as a planner.

"You want to know how we affect people? I saw this woman on probably one of her darkest days, a very low point, and [helped her through] to one of the highest points in her life," he says. "That's the fun part about this job. It's really about making that personal connection with people, making a difference and making a change."

―Maddy Perkins

No. 2 Nick Kavallieratos, Morgan Stanley

Age: 38
AUM: $2,512,017,988
Production: $7,886,893

Nick Kavallieratos wants his clients to understand the full extent of their financial freedoms and focus on more than the daily humdrum of making ends meet.

"I think we get mired day-in and day-out, that we miss the basics in our daily lives in order to attain our goals and find financial freedom," the New York-based advisor says. "I've always found self-fulfillment in helping people figure that out and helping clients attain their overall solution."

Not only is Kavallieratos urging his clients to focus beyond the moment, but he helps them work towards simplifying their approach to money and spending — so they aren't juggling multiple elements in their lives.

"I had a client call me back yesterday after they had paid off their mortgage, and it was the greatest conversation I've had in a long time," he says. They had planned to pay it off in 12 years but ended up paying it off in seven. "It was such a huge advantage to them because they are sending their first child off to college."

Today, Kavallieratos says a key component of his strategy focuses on helping clients understand how things happening at the local level can be affected by global events.

"We're in a state of current affairs where anything could happen abroad that could help your situation at a global level," Kavallieratos says. "We work with clients one-on-one to make sure we can provide them with financial freedoms, but at the same time, hedge them from exposures to geopolitical impact. In a very simplistic way, we make macro decisions so that our individual clients can make micro decisions in their everyday lives."

Kavallieratos has been at Morgan Stanley his entire career. He cites a sea change in his planning philosophy beginning during the recession about a decade ago, when clients were calling frantically, worried about how their money would weather the volatility and uncertainty in the markets.

"At that moment, I think I really started to refocus and reshape the direction I take in my business," Kavallieratos says. "I think, then, I turned a corner to focus more on individual wealth and providing clients with holistic, comprehensive solutions — not just for them, but for their families, their legacy and perhaps most importantly for my clients who serve their communities."

He says he also has several clients who are involved in charity and community service, something that he says is central to his planning philosophy and his life outside the office. "I didn't come from a privileged background," Kavallieratos says. "I believe in paying it forward in a multitude of ways. Progress is a key component of my mantra and what I believe."

―Maddy Perkins

No. 1 Dane Runia, Merrill Lynch

Age: 34
AUM: $2,517,897,789
Production: $10,615,052

Dane Runia has risen to the top of this year's Top 40 ranking in part because he focuses on what clients care about beyond their portfolio.

"If you sat in one of our typical client meetings, you'd be surprised how often we're talking about something other than finances," he says. "Obviously, we're keyed in on that. But we're interested in building relationships that are meaningful and last a long time."

That attentiveness helps clients see that Runia and his eight-member team, which includes his father, genuinely care, he says. It also helps them address wealthy clients' concerns about how their fortunes will impact their children and grandchildren.

"They are interested in what the wealth will do for the kids," he says. "And we utilize Merrill's resources on this because at a certain level of wealth it can complicate kids' lives."

Many of the Provo, Utah-based team's clients are multigenerational families. Runia's father, Scott, has been in the business for more than three decades, all of them at Merrill Lynch. Runia and his brother joined the practice in 2006, after his father’s business partner developed cancer and passed away. Runia's brother died in an accident several years later.

"It's actually shaped our practice. We have really deep relationships with our clients because when they go through tough times, they know we've been through the wringer too," he says.

Many of the clients are also wealth creators, Runia says. The team's mission is to help them diversify in order to stay rich.

But Runia, who studied business and finance at Brigham Young University, emphasizes the importance of maintaining close contact with his clients.

"Our clients call and they talk to us. I don't want them to have a year go by and not have them talk to me or my father," he says. "If the phone rings three times, that's too long."

―Andrew Welsch

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The complete rankings


Firm: Name: Age as of 12/31/17: AUM as of 09/31/2017: Production as of 9/31/2017:
1 Merrill Lynch Dane Runia 34 $ 2,517,897,789 $ 10,615,052
2 Morgan Stanley Nick Kavallieratos 38 $ 2,512,017,988 $ 7,886,893
3 HighTower Advisors Bob White 37 $ 725,374,211 $ 5,761,663
4 Morgan Stanley Mihir Patel 37 $ 386,596,734 $ 4,644,143
5 Morgan Stanley Fulvio Urbinati 39 $ 560,784,552 $ 4,523,420
6 Morgan Stanley Adam Merino 34 $ 506,735,824 $ 4,338,742
7 Merrill Lynch Nicole Christians 36 $ 642,056,683 $ 4,336,563
8 UBS Keith Apton 39 $ 1,096,035,101 $ 4,305,450
9 Merrill Lynch Adam Rosenfeld 39 $ 741,696,067 $ 4,243,907
10 Merrill Lynch Umesh Trikha 35 $ 1,126,279,998 $ 4,212,675
11 Merrill Lynch Stephen Bealer 36 $ 690,260,561 $ 4,114,288
12 UBS Jacob Creydt 39 $ 560,376,308 $ 4,086,467
13* Morgan Stanley Seth Haye37$ 772,964,358$ 4,085,882
13 Ameriprise Geoff Lee 36 $ 324,283,900 $ 3,632,110
14 William Blair John Salvino 38 $ 423,215,742 $ 3,613,768
15 Merrill Lynch Kevin Bruegge 37 $ 752,031,512 $ 3,553,993
16 Merrill Lynch Mark Miller 39 $ 618,856,610 $ 3,506,191
17 Morgan Stanley Matthew Offen 38 $ 689,936,991 $ 3,494,408
18 Morgan Stanley Maxwell Bull 36 $ 674,493,812 $ 3,471,379
19 Merrill Lynch Derek Jancisin 29 $ 797,675,515 $ 3,350,362
20 UBS Chris Shukie 36 $ 407,474,346 $ 3,292,250
21 Merrill Lynch Camper O'Neal 35 $ 579,640,119 $ 3,183,509
22 Morgan Stanley Mark Lewis 38 $ 254,061,823 $ 3,038,592
23 Hilliard Lyons Loren Snyder 32 $ 367,259,000 $ 3,019,818
24 Merrill Lynch Brian Shambo 39 $ 554,004,512 $ 3,008,811
25 Merrill Lynch Todd Dambrauskas 38 $ 357,382,211 $ 2,987,785
26 UBS Aric Zamel 36 $ 292,786,113 $ 2,945,595
27 UBS Daniel Rothenberg 35 $ 4,883,473,216 $ 2,936,702
28 Merrill Lynch John Minnich 36 $ 484,494,438 $ 2,877,324
29 UBS Gabriel Jay 39 $ 480,937,513 $ 2,823,337
30 Merrill Lynch Daniel Nigro 39 $ 385,987,851 $ 2,812,264
31 Morgan Stanley Jordan Eisenberg 38 $ 224,824,045 $ 2,774,454
32 UBS Kalyn Walker 32 $ 674,597,087 $ 2,763,329
33 RBC Christopher Vollmer 38 $ 1,300,000,000 $ 2,750,000
34 UBS Mark Grueninger 39 $ 136,675,850 $ 2,689,824
35 Merrill Lynch Marc Balducci 38 $ 388,837,510 $ 2,677,162
36 Merrill Lynch Michael Shalhoup 33 $ 301,641,339 $ 2,674,852
37 UBS Franco Estrada 36 $ 392,120,170 $ 2,639,339
38 Merrill Lynch Jason Ting 38 $ 405,683,831 $ 2,583,488
39 RBC Eric Englund 34 $ 140,000,000 $ 2,500,000
40 Baird Gregory Sommersberger 37 $ 358,590,302 $ 2,444,890

*Editor’s note: Morgan Stanley advisor Seth Haye has been added to this list. He was not included initially because of a firm error.